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Syllabus

 

Prof. Asim: HIST 407/507: Late Imperial China

CRN 35297/35321

471 McKenzie

Office location: 317 McKenzie Hall

Office hours: Mondays 10:30 am – 12:00 and by appointment

email: inaasim@uoregon.edu [email policy: I’ll answer emails within 24 hours. Emails that request information which can be found on the website will not be answered. Please always first refer to the class news on our website.]

Learning Accommodations
The University of Oregon is working to create inclusive learning environments. If there are aspects of the instruction or design of this course that result in barriers to your participation, please notify me in the first week of class. You may also wish to contact the Accessible Learning Center in 164 Oregon Hall at 346-1155 or uoaec@uoregon.edu

Course requirements

This seminar provides history majors with the opportunity to engage with considerable depth in a research project and produce a research paper based on independent research and the use of primary and secondary sources in fulfillment of  the senior seminar requirement for a major in the Department of History.
Since the course has a discussion format every participant is required to attend every session and to participate actively in discussions of the weekly readings,
attendance alone is insufficient. Your participation in the course is an investment since participation will be 25% of your grade. You will be asked to give oral reports on the readings in every class session. If you are very tired one day, bring some food to class to enhance your energy level. You are expected to be prepared, to contribute to discussions and to be respectful to all other participants. Unexcused absence from more than one session will result automatically in the loss of a letter grade. If you are not able to attend class due to illness or injury, for religious reasons or because of jury duty please notify me as as soon as you are aware of the necessity of absence.

Cell phones, ipods, and other electronic devices have to be turned off during class. Laptop use is limited to taking notes in class.

1. In addition to regular participation, every student will

a. Lead a discussion on at least one of the assigned readings.

b. Give an oral presentation of not more than 8 minutes on the topic chosen for the research paper on April 14.
Give an oral presentation of not more than 8 minutes reporting about the different work steps in writing the paper on April 28.

c. Give an assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of a draft of one of your colleagues’ papers (in  weeks 9 and 10).

2. Produce a two-page statement of the topic of choice with an annotated bibliography of primary and secondary sources. The statement is due at the latest on Friday, April  18 at 10:00 in my office. Failure to complete a satisfactory statement will result in a failing grade for the seminar.

3. Produce a two-page outline of the paper. The outline is due at the latest on Friday, May  2 at  10:00 am in my office. Failure to complete a satisfactory outline will result in a failing grade for the seminar.

4. Produce a research paper of 20-25 pages (including the bibliography), due Monday, June  11  at noon in my office. (75 % of the grade). Papers handed in late will be accepted only with documented medical justification.

PLEASE NOTE: The transliteration system used in this course is PINYIN. Do not use other systems (unless you quote an author who used another transliteration system in her/his work). A table of Pinyin and Wade-Giles is posted on this website. Failing to use PINYIN properly will result in reducing your grade by one point. ( A grade B+ will be graded down as B  etc.)

The research paper of  graduate students will have a length of 25–30 pages.

Required Readings are available online from the library website or will be posted on this website  under “Readings” (password protected).

Course Outline

Week 1

3/31 M 1. Introduction to the course; Chronological survey of political and military events during the Ming and Qing dynasties

Week 2

4/7 M 2. Research tools; further consideration of the seminar topic; topic selection: discussion of materials for selected topics
Readings: Texts 1 & 2 are available online via the Knight Library website!
1. Vincent Goossaert, “Irrepressible Female Piety: Late Imperial Bans on Women Visiting Temples”, in Nan Nü 10 (2008): 212-241.
2. Yiqun Zhou, “The Hearth and the Temple: Mapping Female Religiosity in Later Imperial China, 1550-1900)”, Late Imperial China. Vol. 24, No. 2, Dec. 2003, 109-155.
3. Timothy Brook, The Confusions of Pleasure. Introduction. Chapter “Winter”
4. Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History. Chapters 2 & 3 (pp. 6-38).

Week 3

4/14 M 3. Further consideration of the seminar topic; sources exercise;
Readings:
1. Timothy Brook, The Confusions of Pleasure. Introduction. Chapter “Spring”
2. Richard von Glahn, “The Enchantment of Wealth: The God Wutong in the Social History of Jiangnan”, Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, Vol. 51, No. 2 (Dec. 1991), 651-714.
3. Prasenjit Duara, “The Myth of Guandi, Chinese God of War”, The Journal of Asian Studies. Vol 47, No.4 (Nov. 1988), 778-795.
4. Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History. Chapters 4 & 5 (39-85)

Week 4

4/21 M. Paper topic summary and bibliography due. 10:00 am in my office;
Individual meetings: discussion of paper topic and bibliography


Week 5

4/28 M 5. Progress reports: Presentation and discussion of research topics
Readings:
1. Timothy Brook, The Confusions of Pleasure. Chapters “Summer”& “Fall”
2. Hsieh Bao Hua, “The Market in Concubines in Jiangnan During Ming-Ching China”, Journal of Family History, Vol 33, No. 3, July 2008, 2262-290. (download)
3. Vivienne Lo and Penelope Barrett, “Cooking up Fine Remedies: On the Culinary Aesthetic in a Sixteenth Century Chinese Materia Medica“, Medical History, 2005, 49: 395-422. (download)

4. Mary Lynn Rampolla: A Pocket Guide to Writing in History (all final chapters).

Week 6

5/5 M. Paper outline due. 10:00 am in my office; afternoon meeting; Writing a research paper
Readings:
1. Rowe on the Qing accessible on this website under “Additional Readings” (password protected).
2. Joanna Waley-Cohen, “The New Qing History”, Radical History Review, Issue 88, Winter 2004, pp. 193-206
3. Timothy Brook: “Funerary Ritual and the Building of Lineages in Late Imperial China”, Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, Vol. 49, No.2, pp. 465-499.

{ remainders from last week:

4. Hsieh Bao Hua, “The Market in Concubines in Jiangnan During Ming-Ching China”, Journal of Family History, Vol 33, No. 3, July 2008, 2262-290. (download)
5. Vivienne Lo and Penelope Barrett, “Cooking up Fine Remedies: On the Culinary Aesthetic in a Sixteenth Century Chinese Materia Medica“, Medical History, 2005, 49: 395-422. (download)}

 

Week 7

5/12 M 7. Reading:
Please prepare the text of the article by Hsieh Bao Hua as follows:
Search for the elements that structure the text. Using color markers trace the article for  the sentences, expressions, and words that reveal how the author guides us as readers through his material.

Use one color to mark introduction to /stating of  the argument: Where does s/he introduce it? How is the central point introduced to us? Are we given statements that the author assumes might be critical of her/his views/hypothesis/ approach/technique? Does s/he rebut these statements? How? Is the rebuttal effective?

Use a different color to analyze  the structure: How does s/he introduce us to the topic? Where and how is the outcome of the project/ answer to the initial question mentioned / solved? How does s/he prepare us for the result(s)?

Use a third color for the conclusion: How is the initial argument re-stated? Is it repetitive/ does the summary reveal fresh information/aspects to the initial question?  Does the conclusion leave questions open that you expected to be answered/ mentioned for future research?

You will be responsible to report about the different structural elements that guided your attention during your active reading process and evaluate whether the methodological and stylistic steps are effective and may inform your own writing process. Discussion of research problems.

Week 8

5/19 M 8. no class; individual meetings with instructor about progress on the paper draft

Week 9

5/26 M 9. MEMORIAL DAY (no class)

Week 10

6/2 M. 10. Student-led presentations on the writing of the papers; Electronic resources for history

Week 11

All papers due Monday, June 9 at 12:00 noon in my office.

Pinyin to Wade-Giles Conversion Table

For a transliteration table listing Pinyin and Wade-Giles syllables, the most common transliteration systems used in English language literature concerning China, please click on the link below. (The Zhuyin fuhao system is used in Taiwan. It expresses the Chinese pronunciation of Chinese characters exquisitely and is recommended to learn by those of you who study Chinese.)

wgzypy

 

Protected: Additional Readings

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