Assignments

Module 1: Introduction

Introduction: What is nutritional anthropology?

  1. Pelto, G.H., D. Dufour, Goodman A. 2013 The Biocultural Perspective in Nutritional Anthropology. In: Nutritional Anthropology, D. Dufour et al (Eds), Pp. 1-6. Mayfield Publ.Co
  2. Lee, B. 2000 Eating Christmas in the Kalahari.In: Nutritional Anthropology, A. Goodman et al (Eds), Pp. 12-15. Mayfield Publ.Co.
  3. Grossman, J. 2000 How many calories are there in a 230-calorie dinner? In: Nutritional Anthropology, A. Goodman et al (Eds), Pp. 16-19. Mayfield Publ.Co
  4. Mintz, S. 2002 Food and Eating: Some Persisting Questions. In Food Nations, W. Belasco & P. Scranton (Eds),  Pp. 24 – 33. Routledge: N.Y
Module 2: Nutrition Basics

Crash course in human nutrition. (Knight Library Reserve)
Independent Review: Nutrition Basics:

  1. Principles of Human Nutrition at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
    Review: 222.641.81 Principles of Human Nutrition. http://ocw.jhsph.edu/courses/HumanNutrition/
  2. Read or Skim: Chapters 1 & 2: Carbohydrates in Human Nutrition (FAO Food and Nutrition paper 66).
    http://www.fao.org/docrep/w8079e/w8079e00.htm
  3. Optional: Knight Library Reserve
    Nutrition concepts and controversies. Sizer, F.S. & E. N. Whitney
    a. Chapter 3:The Remarkable Body.
    b. Chapter 4: The Carbohydrates: Sugar, Starch, Glycogen, and Fiber.
    c. Chapter 5: The Lipids: Fats, Oils, Phospholipids, and Sterols.
    d. Chapter 6: The Proteins and Amino Acids.
    e. Chapter 7: The Vitamins.
    f. Chapter 8: Water and Minerals.
  4. Review Website Module 2
  5. Optional: Johns Hopkins Lecture Material – Lectures 2, 3, & 4.

Nutrition Basics PowerPoint

Module 3: Digestion and Taste
  1. Smith, D. and Margolskee, Robert F 2001. Making Sense of Taste. Scientific American 284 (3): 26 – 33.
  2. Eisenstein, M. 2010 More Than Meets The Mouth. Nature 468: S18-S19
  3. Allen, J. 2012 Why Humans Are Crazy For Crispy. Chronicle Higher Educ.
  4. Trivedi, B. 2012 Hardwired for Taste. Nature 486: 7-9

Links:

  1. The Food Museum, The Art of the Digestive system.
    http://www.foodmuseum.com/exgutart.html
  2. The Food Museum, Parts of the Digestive system.
    http://www.foodmuseum.com/exgutparts.html
  3. The Food Museum, History of the Digestive System http://cascourses.uoregon.edu/anth460/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/History-of-Digestive-System.pdf
  4. National Digestive Diseases Institute: Your Digestive System
    http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/yrdd/
  5. Pathophysiology of the Digestive System: Colorado State University
    http://www.vivo.colostate.edu/hbooks/pathphys/digestion/index.html
  6. Digestion Crossword Puzzle
    http://arbl.cvmbs.colostate.edu/hbooks/pathphys/digestion/tests/xw_coreterms.html
Module 4: Dietary Guidelines (All readings are on Blackboard)

Required: See Black Board

Other- Optional (See Blackboard)

Links:

  1. http://www.fao.org/ag/humannutrition/nutritioneducation/fbdg/en/

Module 5: Primate Diet and Digestion

(All readings are on Blackboard)
Primate Diet & Digestion

  1. Katherine Milton Diet and primate evolution.
  2. Milton, K. 2003 The Critical Role Played by Animal Source Foods in Human (Homo) Evolution. Journal of Nutr. Pp. 3886S – 3892S.
Module 6 : Evolution of the Human Diet: From the Paleolithic to South Beach and Beyond

  1. Eaton, S. B. and M. Konner 2013 Paleolithic Nutrition: A Consideration of Its Nature and Current Implications. In: Nutritional Anthropology, A. Goodman et al (Eds), Pp. 51-59.. Mayfield Publ.Co.

2. Konner, M. and SB Eaton 2010 Paleolithic Nutrition Twenty-Five Years Later. Nutrition in Clinical Practice 25 (6): 594-602.

3. Carmody, R and R Wrangham 2009 The energetic significance of cooking. Journal of Human Evolution 57:379–391

4. Alan H. Goodman and George J. Armelagos. 1985 Disease and Death at Dr. Dickon’s Mounds. Natural History September: 12- 18.

5. Armelagos, G. 2010 The Omnivores Dilemma: The Evolution of The Brain and the Detrminants of Food Choice. J. Anth. Res. 66:161-186

Other Resources:

  1. Jönsson, T. et al.  2010 A Paleolithic Diet is More Satiating Per Calorie Than a Mediterranean-like Diet in Individuals With Ischemic Heart Disease. Nutrition & Metabolism 7:85- 94.
  2. Leonard, B. 2000 Food For Thought: Dietary Change Was a Driving Force in Human Evolution. Scientific American.
  3. Hockett, B and J. Haws 2003 Nutritional Ecology and Diachronic Trends in Paleolithic Diet and Health. Evolutionary Anthropology 12:211–216
  4. Bilsborough, S. and N. Mann 2006 A Review of Issues of Dietary Protein Intake in Humans. Intl J Sport Nutr. 16: 129 – 152.
  5. O’Keefe, J. and L. Cordain J. 2004 Cardiovascular Disease Resulting From a Diet and Lifestyle at Odds With Our Paleolithic Genome: How to Become a 21st-Century Hunter-Gatherer. Mayo Clin Proc.79:101-108.
Module 7: (skip this module)

(All readings are on Blackboard)

  1. Alan H. Goodman and George J. Armelagos. Disease and Death at Dr. Dickon’s Mounds.
  2. Kathleen A. Galvin, D. Layne Coppock and Paul W. Leslie Diet.  Nutrition and the Pastoral Strategy.
  3. Darna Dufour. A Closer Look at the Nutritional Implications of Bitter Cassava Use.
  4. Solom Katz, M. Hediger and L.A. Valleroy.  Traditional Maize Processing Techniques in the New World.
  5. Norman Kretchmer. Genetic Variability and Lactose Tolerance.
  6. Peter Brown and Elizabeth Whitaker. Health Implications of Modern Agricultural Transformations: Malaria and Pellagra in Italy.
  7. Jared Diamond. The Double Puzzle of Diabetes.
  8. Jeff Wheelwright. Native American Alleles.
  1. Ulijaszek, S. Dietary Intake Methods in the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition.
  2. Paige Gutierrez The Social and Symbolic uses of ethnic/regional foodways: Cajuns and Crawfish in South Louisiana. (Pp. 130 – 135)
  3. Anne Allison Japanese Mothers and Obentos: The lunch-box as ideological state apparatus. (Pp. 145 -156)
  4. Beoku-Betts, J.  We got our way of cooking Things. Women, Food and Preservation of Cultural Identity among the Gullah.
  5. Oths, K. et al. Social Status and Food Preference in Southern Brazil.

Optional Readings: If you want to read more on the case studies

Peru

  1. Leatherman, T. 2005 A Space of Vulnerability in Poverty and Health: Political-Ecology and Biocultural Analysis. Ethos33: 46 – 70.
  2. Pérez-Cueto, F.and P.  Kolsteren 2004 Changes in the nutritional status of Bolivian women 1994-1998: demographic and social predictors. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 58, Number 4, Pages 660-666
  3. Moreno-Black, G.  1983.  Dietary Status and Dietary Diversity in Native Highland Bolivian Boys.  Ecology of Food and Nutrition 13:149-156

Thailand

  1. Somnasang, P. and G. Moreno-Black. 2000 Knowing, Gathering and Eating: Knowledge and Attitudes Concerning Wild Food in An Isan Village. Ethnobiology 20 (2):197 -216
  2. Moreno-Black, G. and P. Somnasang. 2000  In Times of Plenty and Times of Scarcity: Nondomesticated Food In Northeastern Thailand. Ecology of Food and Nutrition 38: 563-586.
  3. Johnson, N and L. Grivetti 2002 Environmental Change in Northern Thailand: Impact on Wild Edible Plant Availability. Ecology of Food and Nutrition 41:373-399.

Ecuador

  1. Guerrón-Montero, C. and G. Moreno-Black. 2001 Household Structure and Dietary Patterns in the Afro-Ecuadorian Highlands Food and Nutrition Bulletin 22:23 -30.
  2. Leonard, W. et al 1993 Ecological Correlates of Dietary Consumption and Nutritional Status in Highland and Coastal Ecuador. Ecology of food and nutrition. 31: 67-86.
Module 8: Diets in Cross Cultural Perspectives
  1. Ulijaszek, S. Dietary Intake Methods in the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition. In Researching Food Habits. Methods and Problems, H. Macbeth and J. MacClancy (eds), 119- 135. Berghahn Books: New York.

Case Study Resources:

Peru/Bolivia
  1. Berti, P. et al. 2010 Assessment and Characterization of the Diet of an Isolated Population in the Bolivian Andes.  American Journal of Human Biology 22:741–749 (2
  2. Pérez-Cueto, F.and P.  Kolsteren 2004 Changes in the nutritional status of Bolivian women 1994-1998: demographic and social predictors. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 58, Number 4, Pages 660-666
  3. Moreno-Black, G.  1983.  Dietary Status and Dietary Diversity in Native Highland Bolivian Boys.  Ecology of Food and Nutrition 13:149-156
  4. Macdonald B, Johns T, Gray-Donald K, Receveur O. 2004. Ecuadorian Andean women’s nutrition varies with age and socioeconomic status. Food Nutr Bull 25:239–247
Thailand
  1. Somnasang, P. and G. Moreno-Black. 2000 Knowing, Gathering and Eating: Knowledge and Attitudes Concerning Wild Food in An Isan Village. Ethnobiology 20 (2):197 -216
  2. Moreno-Black, G. and P. Somnasang. 2000  In Times of Plenty and Times of Scarcity: Nondomesticated Food In Northeastern Thailand. Ecology of Food and Nutrition 38: 563-586.
  3. Johnson, N and L. Grivetti 2002 Environmental Change in Northern Thailand: Impact on Wild Edible Plant Availability. Ecology of Food and Nutrition 41:373-399.
Ecuador
  1. Guerrón-Montero, C. and G. Moreno-Black. 2001 Household Structure and Dietary Patterns in the Afro-Ecuadorian Highlands Food and Nutrition Bulletin 22:23 -30.
  2. Leonard, W. et al 1993 Ecological Correlates of Dietary Consumption and Nutritional Status in Highland and Coastal Ecuador. Ecology of food and nutrition. 31: 67-86.

(click images to see full size.)

Module 9: Statistics Review

There are no assignments for Module 9.

Module 10 Part A: Nutrition and Growth

  1. Bogin, B. 1999 Evolutionary Perspectives on Human Growth. Ann. Rev. Anthropol. 1999. 28:109.53
  2. Czerniawski, A. 2007 From Average to Ideal: The Evolution of the Height and Weight Table in the United States, 1836–1943. Social Science History 31:273-296.

Module 10 Part B: Obesity

  1. Ulijaszek, S. and Hayley Lofink 2006 Biocultural Perspective on Obesity Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 35:337–60.
  2. Brewis, A. and M. 2006 Gartin Biocultural Construction of Obesogenic Ecologies of Childhood: Parent-Feeding Versus Child-Eating Strategies. Amer. J. Hum. Bio 18:203–213.
  3. Komlos,J. A. Breitfelder and M. Sunder 2009 The transition to Post-Industrial BMI Values Among US Children. Amer. J. Hum Bio. 21:151–160.
  4. Lambert, C. 2004 The Way We Eat Now. Harvard Magazine

Module 11: Hunger and Food Insecurity

  1. Barrett, C. 2010 Measuring Food Insecurity.  Science 327: 825-828.
  2. Allen, P. 2007 The Disappearance of Hunger in America. Gastronomica 7(3):19-23
  3. Holben, D. 2010 Position of the American Dietetic Association: Food Insecurity in the United States. J Am Diet Assoc.110:1368-1377.
  4. Larson, N. and M. Story 2011 Food Insecurity and Weight Status Among U.S. Children and Families. Amer J.  Prev. Med. 40: 166-173.
  5. Martin, M. and A. Lippert 2012 Feeding her children, but risking her health: The intersection of gender, household food insecurity and obesity. Soc. Sci & Medicine 74: 1754-1764.

Links and other resources:

1. Hunger in Oregon: http://oregonhunger.org/hunger-in-oregon. Partners for a Hunger Free Oregon.

2. More about Hunger 2011 FFLC: http://www.foodforlanecounty.org/en/about_hunger/more_about_hunger/

3. Feeding America 2011 Map the Meal Gap: http://feedingamerica.org/hunger-in-america/hunger-studies/map-the-meal-gap/~/media/Files/research/map-meal-gap/ChildFoodInsecurity_ExecutiveSummary.ashx

    Module 12: Nutrition Related Diseases

    I.  GENERAL READINGS

    1. Sapolsky, Robert M. Junk food monkeys.
    2. Pelto, Gretel and Pertti Pelto Diet and delocalization: Dietary changes since 1750.
    3. Popkin, B. 2003 The Nutrition Transition in the Developing World. Development Policy Review, 2003, 21 (5-6): 581-597
    4. Satia, J.  2010 Dietary Acculturation and the Nutrition Transition: An Overview. Appl.  Physiol. Nutr. 35: 219-223

    II. ASSIGNED READINGS: SPECIFIC DISEASES

    1. Diet Related Diseases (See Blackboard)
    2. Nutrition Transition (See Blackboard)

    III. Review websites and video information

    1. Video: Diabetes and Desert Foods: Examples from the O’odham Tradition.
    2. Video: The Desert’s Perfect Foods
    3. American Diabetes Association
    4. Groups affected by Diabetes: (ADA)
    5. CDC: Cholesteral data in the US
    6. CDC: Healthy weight, overweight and obesity data
    7. CDC: Prevalence of Overweight in Children
    8. BMI information
    9. AOA: American Obesity Association